Rural Communities, Historic Towns, Native American Villages and Communal Dwellings 

TOWNS & COMMUNITIES

Eureka, Utah

  1. Managing Director
  2. Managing Director
  3. Managing Director
  4. Managing Director
  5. Managing Director
  6. Managing Director
  7. Managing Director
  8. Managing Director
  1. Managing Director
  2. Managing Director
  3. Managing Director
  4. Managing Director
  5. Managing Director
  6. Managing Director
  7. Managing Director
  8. Managing Director
  1. Managing Director
  2. Managing Director
  3. Managing Director
  4. Managing Director
  5. Managing Director
  6. Managing Director
  7. Managing Director
  8. Managing Director
  1. Managing Director
  2. Managing Director
  3. Managing Director
  4. Managing Director
  5. Managing Director
  6. Managing Director
  7. Managing Director
  8. Managing Director
 Eureka, UT.,on Hwy 6, was established in the 1860's and by 1899 was Utah's major mineral producing area with  high levels of silver, gold, and 
 copper ore in its hills being mined out of four major mines.  The second J.C. Penney store ever opened in Eureka in 1986. Today Eureka appears
 to  be making a very gradual come-back from its multi-decade decline.  In the Tintic mining district, it has many interesting buidlings like the art-
 deco Grade School buildings, and most buildings on Main St.

Elberta, Ut.   Hwy. 6

Elberta, Utah is a quiet little settlement on Highway 6 between Santaquin and Eureka, Ut. It serves the surrounding farming and now, the commuter communities. There is one functional service station and convenience store near Elberta.  

Oak City, Ut.   Hwy 125

  Last Line Says it All

"Not Half Has Been Told and Just As Well"
Oak City is a  long-time farming community with an interesting cemetery dating back to the early 1800's.  The population seems to be declining bujt the residents I met are wonderful and very friendly.  The cemetery is worth the stop.

Genola, Utah

Genola, Utah is a tiny town nestled within fruit orchards that stretch for miles and miles.  The old town from the mining days has been absorbed by what exists now and there is no real town-center, but the LDS Church and the near-by Community Park seem to be where locals congregate.  Approximately a mile outside of the town are the remains of the Standard Reduction Mill, now referred to as the Tintic Ruins.  This spot is possibly the most tagged spot in all of Utah, displaying a art form more common to large urban centers.  The Tintic Ruis require a 3/4 mile hike from a parking area along a steep hillside.  How a wooden sailboat last registered in 2001 in California ended up in Genola no one knows. More photos of Genola ruins can be found at www.rcannefax.com
Bicknell, Ut.

Structures of interest discover along Utah back roads

Scipio, Utah